KEATING – L.J.

Squadron Leader – Chaplain

[Source: CMHA]

CARRINGTON – A. John

John Carrington

Squadron Leader – Pilot – 200, 223, 23 Sqns – Hudson/Liberator

Born 1920; educated QRC; son of John R carrington, Dentist; enlisted from Cambridge 1939; 3 tours; 1st tour: Coastal Command; Hudson; West africa 200 Sqn; 2nd Tour: Coastal Command – Liberator B24 223 Sqn; 3rd Tour: Bomber Command Liberator 100 Group 23 Sqn. Awarded DFC for sinking U Boat. Over 90 missions

[Source: CMHA]

LINDO – Harold Lester

J4762 – Squadron Leader – RCAF – KIA 15/2-1944 (at 27) – Runnymede Memorial, Surrey, UK

[Source: CG, CWGC]

LINDO, F/L Harold Lester (J4762) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.103 Squadron – Award effective 16 June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, 6 July 1917; home in Northwood, Middlesex.  Enlisted in Ottawa, 20 June 1940.  Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 15 August 1940), No.3 AOS (graduated 4 January 1941, No.2 BGS (graduated 15 February 1941), and No.1 ANS (graduated about 16 March 1941 and commissioned).  Proceeded overseas 26 March 1941.  Forced down and missing in 1941 but returned to Britain.  Invested at Buckingham Palace, 4 December 1942.  Killed in action, 15 February 1944, while serving with No.103 Squadron and holding Squadron Leader rank.

Flight Lieutenant Lindo is a most experienced and dependable navigator.  His efficiency and coolness in action have a fine influence on his comrades.  During the many operational sorties on which he has been engaged he has faced bad weather and enemy opposition with an unconquerable spirit of determination to complete his allotted task.

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9598 has recommendation dated 24 July 1942.  He had flown 21 sorties (120 hours 54 minutes) and the text gave a remarkable account of his tour that the published citation only hints at:

10 July 41    Boulogne (4.20)    28 Dec 41    Wilhelmshaven (5.55)
20 July 41    Cologne (6.10)    6 Jan 42    Brest (6.29)
2 Aug 41    Hamburg (8.36)    21 Jan 42    Bremen (7.26)
8 Aug 41    Duisburg (3.45)    3 Mar 42    Paris (6.00)
18 Aug 41    Duisburg (4.37)    10 Apr 42    Essen (5.00)
22 Aug 41    Mannheim (6.55)    25 Apr 42    Rostock (7.33)
27 Aug 41    Mannheim (7.30)    30 May 42     Cologne (6.00)
29 Aug 41    Mannheim (5.00)    1 June 42    Essen (5.00)
13 Oct 41    Dusseldorf (4.16)    6 June 42    Emden (5.36)
22 Oct 41    Mannheim (4.03)    25 Jun 42    Bremen (5.36)
16 Dec 41    Wilhelmshaven (5.43)

This officer joined the squadron a year ago. Throughout that time he has proved himself to be an observer of outstanding merit. His consistent, exemplary navigation and accurate bombing have set a high example which the other observers have been inspired to reach for.

Being recognised as unquestionably the best observer in the squadron, he was appointed Squadron Bombing Leader, which post he has filled with enthusiasm and increasing efficiency for five months.

Although this has given him little opportunity to go on raids he has continually asked to take part and has flown as observer with various pilots, producing extremely good results and being involved in many dangerous situations.  His cheerfulness and efficiency in the face of danger and while under heavy fire from flak have been largely responsible for bringing these sorties to a successful conclusion. All his captains have spoken most highly of him and every captain is keen to have him as observer.

Early on in his operational tour, Flight Lieutenant Lindo, with his crew, landed in the sea. His dinghy was depth-charged by an enemy aircraft before they were rescued. His coolness and cheerfulness under most trying conditions set a fine example to the rest of his crew.

On another occasion his aircraft collided with high tension cables and caught fire. Flight Lieutenant Lindo acted with great coolness, helping the rest of the crew. Despite these two unnerving incidents, occurring at the start of his tour, he has remained most enthusiastic and keen to take part in as many raids as possible.

More recently, when bombing Essen, the port engine of his aircraft failed over the target and the pilot was forced down to extremely low altitude by flak and searchlights. In spite of intense flak and great difficulties, Flight Lieutenant Lindo skilfully navigated his aircraft safely back to the nearest aerodrome in England, greatly assisting his captain to steer clear of defended areas by his skilful map reading on a very dark night. His skill, confidence and high example did much to encourage his crew and bring them and their aircraft safely out of an extremely dangerous situation.

This officer’s fine operational record, magnificent example and unshakable enthusiasm and spirit fully merit the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross for which I strongly recommend him.

This was refined to the following text for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee (shorter than the original submission but much longer than the published citation).

Flight Lieutenant Lindo is an experienced and dependable navigator. His efficiency and coolness in action have had a fine influence on his comrades. During the many operational sorties on which he has been engaged he has faced bad weather and enemy opposition with an unconquerable spirit of determination to complete his allotted task. He has acted as Squadron Bombing Leader for five months. Although this has diminished his opportunity to go on sorties, he has continually asked to take part and has flown as observer with various pilots, producing extremely good results and being involved in many dangerous situations. Early during his operational tour, Flight Lieutenant Lindo was compelled to alight [with] his aircraft on the sea. Whilst afloat in the dinghy with his crew it was depth-charged by enemy aircraft before they were eventually rescued. On this occasion his conduct under most trying conditions was of great benefit to his comrades. On another occasion his aircraft collided with high tension cables and caught fire. Flight Lieutenant Lindo acted with great coolness helping the rest of the crew. Despite these two unnerving incidents, occurring at the beginning of his tour, his enthusiasm for operations remained undiminished.

[Source: Air Force Assiociation of Canada]

BARROWES – J.T. (Jimmy)

Squadron Leader

[Source: CG]

CROSS – Philip Louis Ulric

Picture right: A mixed group of RAF-officers.

A group of colored RAF-officers. Front row, from left: [1] unknown, from Jamaica or Belize; [2] Dusty Miller, from Guyana; [3] S/L Corbett (liason); [4] Ulric Cross, from Trinidad; [5] Johnny Smythe, from Sierra Leone; [6] Mark Walker, from Trinidad; Second row from left: [1] E.A. Gordon from Jamaica; [4] Percy Messiah, from Trinidad; [5] possibly his brother C.A. Messiah from Trinidad; [6] Vivian Thomas from Manchester, Jamaica; [7] Jellicoe Scoon from Grenada. Third row from left: [1] E.R Braithwaite from Guyana? The rest are as yet unknown to us. We invite our visitors to share the names of any person they recognise. [Names courtesy P.L.U. Cross a.o.; Photograph courtesy Audrey Elcombe, copyright unknown - click to enlarge] [Photographs: MOD (left) and AE]

1399189 – F/O – P.L.U. Cross – Trinidad – Ach/P. – attested 19.11.41 commissioned 20.10.423 – DFC 29.6.44 [Source: NA AIR 2/6876 - Nominal Roll of Coloured Candidates, October 1944] Squadron Leader – DFC, DSO – Observer – 139 (Jamaica) Sqn – Mosquito Received the DSO in recognition of his ‘fine example of keennes and devotion to duty’ and ‘exceptional navigational ability’ Born 1917, educated CIC, enlisted 1941; Bomber Command; 8 Group; Pathfinder Sqn; 80 missions; awarded DFC June 1944; DSO Nov 1944 Appears in Hornet Flight by Ken Follet [Source: CG, CMHA, MOD] Black Hornet Squadron Leader Philip Louis Ulric Cross, DSO, DFC (Trinidad & Tobago) 139 (Jamaica) Squadron RAF Bomber Command Squadron Leader Ulric Cross was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) in 1944 for his gallantry during the Second World War. While serving as a Pilot Officer with 139 (Jamaica) Squadron, he participated in bombing attacks across occupied Europe. In 1945 he was also awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) in recognition of his ‘fine example of keenness and devotion to duty’ and ‘exceptional navigational ability’. [MOD] Squadron Leader Ulric Cross was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) in 1944 for his gallantry during the Second World War. While serving as a Pilot Officer with 139 (Jamaica) Squadron, he participated in bombing attacks across occupied Europe. In 1945 he was also awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) in recognition of his ‘fine example of keenness and devotion to duty’ and ‘exceptional navigational ability’. [Source: www.WW2chat.com] World War II airman Ulric Cross recalls ‘The day I almost died’ 139 (Jamaica) Squadron Pathfinders

 

Here is a photo of the legendary Squadron Leader (139 “Jamaica” Squadron)  Phillip Louis Ulric Cross, DFC, DSO, of Trinidad. He later held the position of Chief Liaison Officer for Demobilization of all Colonial Forces, ably assisted by Jamaican born Flight Lieutenant Dudley Thompson. Squadron Leader Cross is alive at 91 after having served as a Judge in Ghana, Cameroon, Tanzania and Trinidad. Later he served as ambassador of Trinidad and Tobago to Germany, France, Norway and High Commissioner to the UK.  Amazingly, he still writes opinion and is as lucid and aware as can be imagined. I am in regular contact with him and we are trying to bring him to the US for interviews preliminary to a documentary.

[Picture below copyright Ean Flanders]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip Louis Ulric Cross, DFC, DSO World War II Royal Air Force Squadron Leader (139 “Jamaica Squadron”) Excerpt of April 2008 interview of by Gabriel J. Christian – For King & Country (Irving Andre & Gabriel Christian) After high school [at St. Mary’s Port of Spain], I worked for a while with the  [Trinidad] government on the railroad. But by 1941, Britain stood alone. Dunkirk had been a defeat for Britain and Hitler had conquered all of Europe. The world was drowning in fascism and America was not yet in the war, so I decided to do something about it and volunteered to fight in the RAF.  We took the ship Strathall for twelve days days, straight to Greenock. A lorry awaited us and took us straight into the uniform of the RAF and training. So from November 1941 to November 1942, I trained at Cranwell on the wireless, did meteorology, bomb aiming, navigation and Morse code. I graduated as a Pilot Officer and was assigned to Bomber Command I served as a navigator in the Pathfinder section of 139 squadron; the famous “Jamaica Squadron” of the RAF.  The pathfinders led the way on bombing raids and marked the target; a most dangerous task.  Our unit flew the famous Mosquito bomber, which was made mainly of wood. Jamaica had paid for many of the planes of 139 squadron, hence the name.  There was also a Trinidad Squadron, where Trinidad had paid for those planes. I was the only West Indian on my squadron. I was lucky to have served at fixed pre war bases such as Marham, Wyton and Upwood. The fixed bases were more comfortable. There were many other temporary bases which had been scattered across the United Kingdom.  I flew 30 missions over Germany and occupied Europe. After 30 missions one earns a rest and can divert to teaching other pilots etc. However, I was interested in continuing the mission. At 50 missions, they again asked me to take a rest. I declined and flew 80 missions over Germany and occupied Europe before the war ended.  I did 22 missions over Berlin and made it through much flak; but one had to focus on the mission. My most harrowing mission was when one of the engines of our Mosquito fighter-bomber was shot up over Germany and we came down to 7,000 feet from 35,000 feet. We struggled back to England and crash landed in a quarry. It was a narrow escape but we made it out alive. The navigator is key, as we are the ones who tell the pilot how to get to and from the destination or target.   I ended the war as a squadron leader and was then sent to the Colonial Office to act as liaison for all colonial forces. It was there that I was phoned and advised that I was awarded the DSO. A plane was sent for me and I was given the award and we had a party. In all 250 Trinidadians flew in combat in the RAF during the war and 50 died in action. Many hundreds more, maybe more than a thousand, served with other West Indians, as ground crew. I knew the Jamaican Vincent Bunting; he was a fighter pilot and I believe he flew in the Battle of Britain. I met him in England. Julian Marryshow of Grenada was also a fighter pilot and he is still alive, I believe.  Osborne (should read Osmond, see remark below) Kelsick of Montserrat was a fighter pilot. I met Michael Manley of Jamaica in London, still in the uniform of the Royal Canadian Air Force and we became friends.  Billy Strachan of Jamaica was a bomber pilot.  Winston Racile and Gilbert Hubah came to England with me on the Strathall; they were both of East Indian origin and became RAF fighter pilots. Our Trinidadian contingent also had people of Indian, Chinese and European origin.  I knew Dyrample of Dominica (Edward Scobie) and would meet him when we went down to London.  Dudley Thompson of Jamaica was a flight officer and he was my assistant at the Colonial Office after the war. [Courtesy Gabriel Christian]

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