WOOLER – Herbert Basil

Name: WOOLER, HERBERT BASIL
Initials: H B
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Pilot Officer (Pilot)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 406 (R.C.A.F.) Sqdn
Age: 22
Date of Death: 08/01/1942
Service No: 103600
Additional information: Son of Edmund Upton Wooler, and of Dorothy Gladys Wooler, of Halfway Tree, St. Andrew, Jamaica.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Sec. H. Grave 290.
Cemetery: CHEVINGTON CEMETERY

Beaufighter T3037 on GCI exercise crashed near the Stobswood colliery, Widderington, Northumberland. Also killed Sgt T. Williams – 620942.

[Source: www.WW2chat.com]

Service no. on enlistment   1190610
Service no. on Commission   103600

[Courtesy AD]

THORNE – Arthur George

605502 – A.G. Thorne – Trinidad – attested 28.10.42 – Sgt. Air Gunner UK 4.5.43
159225 – P/O – commissioned 2.9.43 – Missing (FB) 20.12.43

[Source: NA AIR 2/6876]

Name: THORNE, ARTHUR GEORGE
Initials: A G
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Pilot Officer (Air Gnr.)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 78 Sqdn.
Date of Death: 20/12/1943
Service No: 159225
Additional information: Son of Herman A. Thorne and Imogene Thorne, of Brown’s Town, St. Ann’s, Jamaica.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Coll. grave 6. A. 15-21.
Cemetery: DURNBACH WAR CEMETERY

Halifax LW338 crashed near Michelbach, 14 km N of Aschaffenburg, Germany. (Chorley’s Bomber Command Losses Vol.. 4, page 433).
[Source: www.WW2chat.com]

SMYTHE – Noel Bentley

1389984 – N.B. Smythe – Jamaica – attested 6.5.41 – F/O – Pilot –
143667 – P/O – commissioned 23.3.43 – Missing believed killed

[Source: NA AIR 2/6876 – Nominal Roll of Coloured Candidates, October 1944]

Name: SMYTHE, NOEL BENTLEY
Initials: N B
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Pilot Officer (Pilot)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force
Unit Text: 196 Sqdn.
Age: 22
Date of Death: 26/06/1943
Service No: 143667
Additional information: Son of Canute Constantine Smythe, and Amy Lucille Smythe, of Cross Roads, Jamaica.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Plot 13. Row 8. Grave 1.
Cemetery: AMERSFOORT (OUD LEUSDEN) GENERAL CEMETERY

[Source: www.WW2chat.com]

DUNCAN – Allan Uriah

Name: DUNCAN, ALLAN URIAH
Initials: A U
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Pilot Officer (Nav.)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit Text: 9 Sqdn.
Age: 25
Date of Death: 02/12/1943
Service No: 155918
Additional information: Son of Eustace Allan Duncan and Ellen Ann Duncan, of Above Rocks, Jamaica.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: 5. K. 29.
Cemetery: BERLIN 1939-1945 WAR CEMETERY

Lancaster – DV332 – 9 Sqn – crashed NE of Brunsendorf, Germany. (see: Chorley’s Bomber Command Losses. More info on crew in his Vol. 4 page 408).

[Source: www.WW2chat.com]

INNISS – George Harold Frederick

Name: INNISS, GEORGE HAROLD FREDERICK
Initials: G H F
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Pilot Officer (Pilot)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force
Unit Text: 106 Sqdn.
Age: 24
Date of Death: 04/02/1941
Service No: 43036
Additional information: Son of Charles H. Inniss and Caroline Inniss, of Barbados. Arts Graduate of Durham University.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: Plot L. Row A. Grave 15.
Cemetery: NANTES (PONT-DU-CENS) COMMUNAL CEMETERY

Hampden AD750 – gardening off St.Nazaire. Crashed near St.Pète-en-Retz (between St.Nazaire and Nantes, Loire-et-Atlantique, France).

[Source: www.WW2chat.com]

George Inniss 2

Photograph probably taken when George gained his wings on 23rd March 1940

[Courtesy Peter Burton/BajanThings]

Read a very extensive report on George’s live, his service in the RAF and the crash that killed him on the Bajan Things website (with many pictures): www.bajanthings.com

A summary:

P/O George HF Inniss (43036): 31st May 1916 to 5th February 1941
George won a Barbados scholarship and undertook a Classics degree at Codrington College Barbados – conferred by Durham University. He came to the UK in Aug 1938 to undertake a teaching diploma at London University – the intention was he would then join a school in Cambridge. We don’t think he did the latter. Instead on 6 Sept 1939, – 3 days after WWII was declared on Germany – George volunteered for the RAF. As a commonwealth citizen constriction would not have applied to him. He was a true volunteer. Having trained as pilot George was assigned to 106 squadron on 15 Dec 1940. It took approx. 14 month to train him as a pilot. He joined with just 170 hour flying time. In normal circumstances it took between 18 months to 2 years and 200 to 320 flying hours to train a pilot for the RAF, however in 1939 there was an acute shortage of pilots and training was shortened. So having spent 14 months being trained as a pilot – George was killed in action on his first operational sortie. Such a sad story.

Excerpts from the webpage on Bajan Things:

“The body of Navigator P/O George Harold Frederick Inniss was found away from the crash-site. He bailed-out too low and was attached to his parachute. He has a bullet wound in his chest.”

On George’s last flight he is listed as Observer (navigator/bomber). In the early days newbie pilots were often put as Observers to build up their experience.

On the evening of 4th February 1941, six Handley Page Hampden Mk. I aircraft from 106 Squadron, RAF Bomber Command took off from RAF Finningley, near Doncaster, South Yorkshire at 17.30hrs to lay mines in the Bay of Saint-Nazaire and to bomb a French aircraft factory located adjacent to the aerodrome at Château Bougon.

AD750’s mission was to bomb the French aircraft manufacturer: La Société Nationale des Constructions Aéronautiques de l’Ouest (SNCAO) factory situated adjacent to the aerodrome at Château Bougon (now known as: Aéroport Nantes Atlantique). That night fog covered the whole area. Near to Château Bougon was a German flak corps anti-aircraft artillery battery.

Prior to releasing its bombs AD750 was hit by German flak. The aircraft exploded when it crashed nose first in a field at La Marronnière farm, La Marsoire, Pont-Saint-Martin, Loire-Atlantique about 2 km from the target.

The standing RAF rules for airmen were aircrew should only bail-out when there was no other option. This meant sometimes it was too late. On the night of 4thFebruary 1941 there was fog and little visibility. Given the visibility that night and what we learnt in the 106 Squadron Personal Experience Reports for the mission, our guess is that AD750 was probably at an altitude of 2,000ft or lower. Prior to bailing-out it was necessary for the crew to put on their parachutes. While flying the crew did not wear their parachutes in order to remain mobile within the cramped quarters of the Handley Page Hampden Mk. I airframe. The crew putting on their parachutes would have eaten up precious time and altitude.

We believe two of the crew were able to bail-out but did not survive and two of the crew were unable to bail-out and died when AD750 crashed /exploded.

Often when aircrew bailed-out they would not have enough altitude for the parachutes to open properly. We believe this was what happened with the AD750 crash.

With AD750 one crew member’s charred body was found at the crash-site attached to remnants of his parachute, suggesting he bailed-out too late. This is believed to have been SGT Jack Lewis Franco who we think was the ventral (under belly) gunner who would have escaped via the jettisoned rear exit door in the belly of the Hampden.

The other crew member that bailed out, was found away from the crash-site. He survived but was severely hurt and found the next morning on 5th February 1941 dying from his injuries. It is understood he was shot by the Germans. This crew-member is believed to have been the navigator P/O George Harold Frederick Inniss who would have been the first to bail-out given he was found away from the crash-site. He would have escaped via the front exit door in the belly of the Hampden.

The two crew that were unable to bail-out are believed to have been the pilot F/O William Kelman Burr Thomas and the dorsal (upper) gunner SGT Frederick Arnold Colson. F/O William Kelman Burr Thomas and SGT Frederick Arnold Colson are buried in a joint grave at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Pont-du-Cens Communal Cemetery.

[Source: Peter Burton/Bajan Things]

MILLER – Bruce Fitzgerald Henry

1383411 – B.F.H. Miller – Barbados – Ach/Observer – attested 31.12.40 158294 – P/O – D.F. 22.10.43

[Source: NA AIR 2/6876 – Nominal Roll of Coloured Candidates, October 1944]

Name: MILLER, BRUCE FITZGERALD HENRY
Initials: B F H
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Pilot Officer (Nav.)
Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve Unit Text: 103 Sqdn.
Date of Death: 22/10/1943
Service No: 158294
Awards: DFC
Additional information: Husband of Helen Elizabeth Miller, of Sawley, Long Eaton, Derbyshire.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead Grave/Memorial
Reference: 16. E. 9.
Cemetery: HANOVER WAR CEMETERY

Lancaster LM314 Mission to Kassel T/O 18.00 from Elsham Wolds. Crashed at Rischenau, 9 km SSE of Lügde.
W/O K R Lee DFC
F/L P J Blurton DFC (P2)
Sgt M Sheedy P/O B F H Miller DFC
Sgt D Adams
Sgt C W Gray
Sgt C L Spink
F/Sgt G G Sveinson RCAF DFC
LG’d 28th March, 1944 Pilot Officer Bruce Fitzgerald Henry MILLER (158294), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, No. 103 Squadron, with effect from 17th October, 1943

[Source: www.WW2chat.com]

Bruce Miller DFC was navigator in Ken Lee’s crew in 103 Squadron RAF and was killed in 1943.

103 Squadron Lee crew with Bruce Miller

[Source/Photo copyright: David Fell/ 103 Squadron Website – more pictures there]

Back row: C.P. King, J.S. Partridge, A.A. Walrond, J.L.L. Yearwood, M.R. Cuke, E.W. Barrow - Front row: G.D. Cumberbatch, A.P.C. Dunlop, H.E.S. Worme, G.A. Barrow, A.O. Weekes, B.F.H. Miller.

 

 

 

The Barbados Second Contingent Back row: C.P. King, J.S. Partridge, A.A. Walrond, J.L.L. Yearwood, M.R. Cuke, E.W. Barrow – Front row: G.D. Cumberbatch, A.P.C. Dunlop, H.E.S. Worme, G.A. Barrow, A.O. Weekes, B.F.H. Miller. Subsequently killed were: Sgt. Charles Parnell King, Sgt. Arthur Adolphus Walrond, Pilot Mark Radford Cuke, Sgt. Grey Doyle Cumberbatch, Flying Officer Andrew P.C. Dunlop, Pilot Officer Bruce F.H. Miller The First Contingent, the Harold Wright Contingent as is became known, sailed 27th July 1940 and was recruited for the forces generally. However, the Second Contingent were recruited for the RAF and departed Barbados in November 1940. The 12 men selected included Errol W. Barrow, who would survive the war, enter politics and eventually become Barbados’ first Prime Minister (1966-1976) [Source: Barbados at War 1939-1945 by Warren Alleyne, privately published 1999, p.9] In 2008 the Barbados Postal Service issued a set of stamps commemorating their men who served in the Royal Air Force in WW2. More »

ETIENNE – Hugh Terrence

1392533 – H.T. Etienne – Leeward & Windward Islands – attested 19.6.41 – P/O – Pilot
129058 – F/O – commissioned 1.9.42 – Missing believed killed – D.P. 5.3.43

[Source: NA AIR 2/6876 – Nominal Roll of Coloured Candidates, October 1944]

129058 – Flying Officer
Service No: 129058  Service: RAFVR
Trade/Branch:   Pilot    DOB:
Squadron(s): 214 (F.M.S.) Sqn
Station/Unit/Ship: Chedburgh
Group: 3     Command:   Bomber
Nationality: St Lucia
Disposal:   KIA   Age  21  yrs   Date Died:    5 Mar 1943
Aircraft 1: Stirling Mk3 BK662 BU-K

According to Chorley the aircraft took off at 19.35 hrs from their base at Chedburgh, Suffolk on a raid to Essen. They were shot down by flak and crashed into the sea west of Ijmuiden, Holland at 22.10 on 5 March 1943. All the crew were killed. Only the body of William Hedley Trotter was found. Chorley also notes that this aircraft was 214 Sqn’s first Mk III Stirling loss. (Previously they’d been using / losing Stirling I’s). The crew comprised of : Sgt Harry William Baldock (Pilot), Sgt Peter Roy Kimber, F/O Hugh Terence Etienne, Sgt William Taylor, Sgt William Hedley Trotter (Air Gunner), Sgt Ernest Albert Wright, F/S Alphe Baptiste Amirault (RCAF); (Source : Richard Trotter nephew of William Hedley Trotter, Ian Hunt and Nightjar Newsletter)

Buried At: RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
Grave/Memorial : Panel 124.
Next of Kin: Son of Auguste and Rosetta Etienne, of Castries, St. Lucia, West Indies.

He was a Civil Servant in St Lucia but left home in 1940 to join the RAF

[Source(s): Trinidad Guardian 20 Mar 1943; CWGC; 214 (FMS) Sqn Association]

Rembembered on St. Lucia website

Possibly the crew of BF478. Sgt Ronald V. Street is shown on front right. This is from the collection of the sister of Ronald. Are you able to recognise and place names to any of the other crew? Mr. Ben Eustice feels that the West Indian chap, right, back row is F/O. Hugh Terence Etienne 129058 RAFVR – he was later ‘missing’ on an operation 5th March 1943. Flying with 214 Squadron Stirling BK662 BU-K on a raid to Essen when they were hit by flak, crashing into the North Sea. (courtesy Nicky Davenort) – See more at: http://aircrewremembered.com/evans-john.html

LANG – James

Pilot Officer – POW

[Source: The Trinidad Guardian 12 Mar 1943 from The West India Committee Circular – February 1943, courtesy Jerome Lee, CMHA]

NANTON – Patrick Bindon

1383400 – P.B. Nanton – Leeward & Windward Islands – attested 30.12.40 – Pilot
118548 – P/O – commissioned 27.3.42 – Missing believed killed – D.P. 4.11.42

[Source: NA AIR 2/6876 – Nominal Roll of Coloured Candidates, October 1944]

118548 – P/O – 38 Sqn – pilot – Wellington – MIA/KIA at 24 years old on 4 November 1942

Son of Robert Holberton Binden Nanton and Isabel Carden Nanton, of St. Johns, Antigua.

[Source: The Trinidad Guardian 12 Mar 1943 from The West India Committee Circular – February 1943, courtesy Jerome Lee, CMHA and Frank Ramon Clarke/CWGC]

“Seeking relatives or anyone who knew of Pat Nanton.  He was the son of Robert and Isabel Nanton of St Johns, Antigua and was a pilot in the RAF with the rank of Pilot Officer.  I joined his crew as front gunner at OTU Harwell (Berkshire).  On completion of training we flew a new Wellington bomber to Egypt at the end of July 1942 and on arrival were posted to 38 Squadron RAF based at Shallufa.  I transferred to another crew as a torpedo carrying Wellington had no front gunner.  Pat and the rest of my crew failed to return from operations against enemy shipping in the Aegean sea on 4th nov 1942.  He is listed on the war memorial at El Alamain as having died that day with no known grave at the age of 24.  Not only was he my pilot but a personal friend, a fine brave man who came from his native country to join the RAF and help us in our fight against the enemy and paid the ultimate price.  Other members of the crew not listed by the war graves commission were Sgt Barry and Sgt Williams, so it is possible they survived that fatal mission.  If anyone knows of any of these men, please contact me so we can exchange memories of old comrades.  Nobby.”
Posted By:
Frank Ramon Clarke on Sunday 28 April 2002 on www.missing-you.net

patrick-bindon-nanton-raf

 

[Photograph courtesy Audrey Dewjee]

HYNAM – Winston Kitchener (Pony)

Winston Kitchener Hynam, 103 Squadron, was awarded the DFM in November 1942 while Sergeant. He was described as an impurturbable and reliable NCO who has served as Wireless Operator/Front Gunner, and Bomb Aimer. In December 1943, now Pilot Officer with 100 Squadron, he was awarded the DFC. Possibly his RAF numbers: 1283669 when Sergeant and 155808 when Pilot Officer (promoted September 1943?) . He is the only West Indian to hold both the DFM and DFC. Used to be Warden of West Indian Students Centre in Earls Court in 1980.

[Source: AE]

WKH At WESC Opening

Winston seen in the background during the opening of the West Indian Students’ Centre in 1955. He is visible just behind Princess Margaret and companions at the 25sec mark of the report by Pathe News: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGoDfSzz_7o

[Courtesy Matthew McKinnon]

Winston Hynam flew as Air Bomber in 103 Squadron RAF with Squadron Leader John H. Kennard DFC for 6 ops. [Source: David Fell/ 103 Squadron Website] Military History of Barbados 1627-2007 by Major Hartland Matthew McKinnon is the grandson of Winston Kitchener Hynam. He kindly sent us the photographs below – including images of his logbook. ‘Pony’ Hynam died in 1991 and his widow Doris Hynam passed away in early 2008. They are survived by their daughters Roma and Carole. Mr. McKinnon informs us that Winston was the Warden (and resident, in the top floor flat) of the West Indian Students Centre from 1954 until 1980, where he got to know Cy Grant (who also flew with 103 Squadron) when he would visit. Click on any picture to enlarge.

Pony-1

‘Pony’ Hynam

Pony-2Pony 2
Group 4Air Gunners Course
Group 5
Group 1
Group 2No.50 Bombing Leaders Course, Manby 1943
MissionsList of Missions (2nd tour) RecommendationRecommendation for DFM
Pony & MollyPony & Doris Molynyeaux a.k.a. ‘Molly’, the future Mrs. Hynam

Plaque 2 Plaque 1

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